Pixels & Plumage

 

My D850 arrived, Nikon’s new top of the line professional DSLR. Of course, to scrounge up the money, I had to sell a D700 & a D800 PLUS a 500mm lens.

Incredibly, the D850 is so fast (7/fps continuous shooting) and powerful (45.7MP) and processes such large files that the two storage cards alone cost almost 500 dollars!

But I couldn’t be happier. Like Tzuri, my Nikon goes with me everywhere I go.

After several years shooting street scenes, I am excited about bird photography again. Maximo Park, I’ve discovered, is teeming with early morning photo ops, especially along Frenchman’s Creek. Across the water just happens to be my alma mater, Eckerd College.

(Jack Eckerd, a wealthy drugstore magnate, donated a bunch of money to Florida Presbyterian College, and they changed their name.)

Some frisky birds (apparently skipping class) obligingly let me take their picture.

 

But what’s this? Suddenly in my viewfinder hunkered down in a briar patch was a strange critter. Nice plumage. Perhaps a snowbird?

Then she turned enough for me to recognize her as the common coed.

Coeds – I read up on them in the Audubon book – flock to colleges twice a year, nest in coops at treetop level, and often display their colors during mating season.

Ms. Coed squatted for a while and I went about my business of shooting other species. Then I noticed that she had reached for a Bic lighter. It was 46 degrees outside and I wondered if she needed to warm her hands.

No. Coed casually lit up a little green . . . crack pipe?

After several deep inhales she stretched her wings and wriggled into some new feathers.

Then she settled down and by the look on her face seemed to be enjoying some warm fuzzies.

Okay, sing along now, to the tune of Mickey Mouse:

E-C-K . . . E-R-D

D-R-U-G-S!

🙂 🙂 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

Osprey w/ Headless Fish

I have taken so few opportunities to photograph wildlife in the last three years that I’m afraid I’ve forgotten how. My 400mm lens rarely leaves the house.

And osprey? They are as common in these parts as vultures. So much so that I once vowed never to bother photographing them again.

🙂  But I’ve rarely made a vow I didn’t mind breaking. 🙂

🙂 🙂 🙂